'Jojo Rabbit' Review

'Jojo Rabbit' Review
An Important WWII Satire

Rating: ★★★★★

In der vein of Quentin Tarantino's 'Inglourious Basterds', worthy Best Picture nominee 'Jojo Rabbit' retells the events of World War II from the perspective of a young Nazi Youth boy Jojo, who's imaginary friend is Adolf Hitler. But his world is flipped upside down when he discovers a Jew living in his walls.

This quirky satire balances absurdist black comedy and shocking drama seamlessly. One moment your sides would be hurting due to laughter, the next your jaw would drop in shock; the shift between the two drastically different emotions never felt jarring. While this movie is much more lighthearted than other movies that take on this horrific topic, it doesn't shy away from the horrors.

The acting from the leads and supporting cast is flawless. For Roman Griffin Davis' first credit, he delivered one of the best child performances put to screen. The lack of an Oscar nomination for his performance is baffling. Scarlett Johansson and Thomasin McKenzie also give great performances as Jojo's mother Rosie and a Jew that Rosie hides in her walls. The ever-increasing, bizarre CV of Taika Waititi has added a new directing, writing and acting credit as he plays the idiotic and childish imaginary Adolf Hilter. His performance doesn't diffident away from his real-life counterpart's terrifying demeanour but for the most part Waititi plays his character for laughs; poking fun at the over-the-top dictator.

The laugh-out-loud, pitch-black comedy fits perfectly with Waititi's signature style while also pay homage to comedic greats such as Mel Brooks and Monty Python.

With the incredible talent in front of and behind the screen, 'Jojo Rabbit' tackles the heavy subject of Nazis, the Holocaust and Fascism in a satirical way while delivering an increasingly important message. The performances are excellent, the production design & costumes are magnificent and the writing is brilliant. Not only is this a serious awards contender but a well-deserving one too.

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